Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

ILLUSION by Rikkert Leijs

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Another wonderful Grès et Delibasi talent I enjoyed working with on his necessary copy is Rikkert Leijs. This young gun’s artisanship and creative sense of direction made his debut in Milan triumphant and next thing he knew he was on Art Threads for Designjunction 2017.

KOCOWISCH

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Rarely is a copy writing job so much fun and such close collaboration as it was for KOCOWISCH designers Koen Coppens and Willem Schouten. Together with their agent Grès et Delibasi and my dear friend and art director Mrs. Karen Heuter we made this beautiful brochure for their debut collection of lamps and jewelry inspired by mathematical shapes called The Kocohedron Collection.

Cultuurfonds Mode Stipendium 2017

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Sparring partner, ghost writer, speech coach… I don’t even know what to call myself working behind the scenes for Dutch Fashion Foundation’s Angelique Westerhof, whenever the occasion rises, like the annual Cultuurfonds Mode Stipendium ceremony. The rightful winner for the 2017 stipend of a generous € 50.000,- was Gerrit Rietveld Academie alumnus Ronald van der Kemp, and our speech trumpeted his impressive artisanship, his generosity towards fashion students and emerging designers, and most of all his gutsy new approach using whatever he can get his hands on, from leftover couture fabrics to vintage pieces and whatever scrap of material his magpy-eyes desire.

Collectie Arnhem 2017

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Freedom! Inconvenience! Madness! And a hard-boiled egg… the press release for Collectie Arnhem 2017 – that resulted from my communications workshop with these 3rd year fashion students at ArtEZ – literally oozed with fashion’s newfound optimism and extrovert creativity. Yellow, the colour of the sun and the sole colour in the entire collection, made everything beam with hope. Well done Iris Bambacht, Anna Bernal-van Geenhuizen, Douwe de Boer, Guusje de Bruin, Jolijn Corporaal, Emmy Hermans, Amarens Joustra, Sarah Kerbosch, Merrit Koek, Gina Malagodi, Naomi Marcela, Mehdi Mashayekhi, Alicia Minnaard, Nina Pen, Dennis Schreuder, Maria van Steenoven and Amber Willemztijn, the presentation at …,staat’s NewWertheater was delightful!


Moderating MODEVOLK @ O-P-A

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Talking about fashion…. it was an honour and great fun to moderate this evening about fashion and identity titled MODEVOLK, held at Ontwerp Platform Arnhem (O-P-A) on October 20th, 2016, where my former student Duran Lantink presented his Sistaaz of the Castle project that he did with that other Rietveld alumnus Jan Hoek (their project won the Dutch Design Award in 2016), and where Museum Rotterdam curator Sjouk Hoitsma talked about her ROFFA 5314 project. The take away of the evening was that any form of cultural appropriation that does not involve the actual culture is totally last century.

MODEBELOFTE 2016 ‘Adaptive Travelers’

Monday, October 31st, 2016

It’s been thrilling as always to be part of the Modebelofte team, bringing the fiercest talents from the best international BA and MA fashion courses to Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven. Although my part in this – textual curation, communication and hosting the Expert Meeting for fellow educators, press and designers – is peanuts compared to what it takes to put this show on the road. Shout out to the fabulous curator & event designer team Niek Pulles (Heyniek) and Harm Rensink, our superwoman project manager and PR queen Holly Syrett of GW Agency, the team responsible for all the trafficking, the graphic designers at Studioand.nl and campaign photographer Imke Ligthart…. and of course the queen bee of them all, initiator Ellen Albers of You Are Here. Check out the Modebelofte 2016 ‘Adaptive Travelers’ site for all the wonderful participating designers and more.

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HOZAN ZANGANA

Friday, September 16th, 2016
Shaping from intuition

Shaping from intuition

 

Hozan Zangana was fifteen years old when he applied for asylum in The Netherlands in 1998. His future starts a decade later when he decides to study at Design Academy Eindhoven. Not an obvious choice, given the road he had to travel, but it is exactly this background that will determine the essence of his design practice.

Born and raised in Kirkuk in the north of Iraq, Hozan Zangana was mesmerized from a very early age by the original 7th century Kufic script with its heavy calligraphy full of voluptuous curves and fat strands like charmed snakes. They almost seem small sculptures. Silent shadows of ancient Mesopotamian and Persian statues. Hozan Zangana digs deep in his study of the shapes of the Kufic script and discovers how the history of the region is told through the hands of the old calligraphy masters; there must be a relation between this monumental writing style and the rise of a religion that prohibits the making of images and sculptures and that would destroy so many art treasures. Age-old cultures have been reduced to two-dimensional decorative patterns this way. The original volume, which is so meaningful for the Kufic calligraphy, disappears over time and the script slims down to mere lines. Modern Kufic can expect only one question: ‘What is it?’ This question is essential to Zangana; it draws us as spectators into an abstract space. The result is a collection of intuitive objects that communicates like the 7th century Kufic script.

In the midst of the chaos of the world and its eventful history Hozan Zangana creates silence. He works in meditative concentration; once the ratio is silenced his heart and hands can speak out freely. This is how his objects come into being; they all tell a story which contains a message for years and years to come, he hopes.

It was the designer Enzo mari who introduced Hozan Zangana to the story of an old tribal chief who urges his people to return home before dark so as to not fall prey to the animals. When two members of his tribe repeatedly return late he decides to observe them. While the others come running like hares to their nests the old chieftain finds the two dropouts lingering on a hill, their gazes caught in the beauty of the sunset. Enzo Mari was referring to our intuitive vocation towards beauty and art. For Hozan Zangana the story contains an all too familiar truth; people are still on the run and art will never loose its light.

Photography by Kasia Gatkowska

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Modebelofte 2014 ‘Seductive Precursors’

Friday, September 16th, 2016

Better posted late than never as the 2014 edition was when Modebelofte – an annual international selection fierce freshly graduated fashion talents showcased during Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven – came into full force when initiator YOU ARE HERE teamed up with curators and designers Niek Pulles a.k.a. Heyniek  and Harm Rensink. Having been part of the Modebelofte team from 2012, guarding the concept and all the copy along the way, it is my honor to shine some light on the creative forces released into this world year after year. See HERE a video impression by Heyniek.

The designers selected for the 2014 edition were: Charlotte Tydeman, Angel Chen, Richard Quinn, Fiona O’Neill, Olya Kuryschuk, Jessica Mort and Anita Hirlekar  from Central Saint Martins; Ida Gro Christiansen  and Emma Hardstaff from Royal College of Art, in London; Adam Marc James from University of Westminster; Inna Stein & Caroline Rohner from Weissensee School of Art, Berlin; Tijme Veldt, Fien Ploeger, Klara Válková, Marije Seijn and Jurjen van Houte from Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Amsterdam; Hyein Seo and Flora Seierl from Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp; Bastian Visch and Gino Anthonisse from Royal Academy of Art, The Hague; Karin Vlug, Vera Roggli, Chiara Siahaan, Sonia Aissaoui and Yiyu Chen from ArtEZ, Arnhem.

A selection:

In an attempt to capture body movements Ida Gro Christiansen came to combine flexible materials with stiffer ones allowing for new shaping possibilities and a different shaping language. The untraditional material combination adds an uncontrollable dimension into the pattern cutting process. The main material for the collection is a base of super thin stretch tulle, with boning heat pressed into it, made of laser cut furniture wool from Kvadrat hand painted with a high gloss rubber. 

In an attempt to capture body movements Ida Gro Christiansen came to combine flexible materials with stiffer ones allowing for new shaping possibilities and a different shaping language. The untraditional material combination adds an uncontrollable dimension into the pattern cutting process. The main material for the collection is a base of super thin stretch tulle, with boning heat pressed into it, made of laser cut furniture wool from Kvadrat hand painted with a high gloss rubber.

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Flora Miranda’s collection deals with the disintegration of physical borders, with the immaterial body and being. Her vision was to beam oneself from one place to the other, to break the system of space and time. The collection shows futuristic garments, fragmented and fleeing from their strict form. Colours are reduced to black and blue, making the body seem ‘scanned’ and read as pure information. The material shows sharp borders and hard shapes. Digitally printed leather is floating in rings around the body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tijme Veldt’s graduation collection ‘Rosa Supernova’ is about a boy who can’t tell the difference between his dreams and his reality anymore. The visual narrative closes in on the moment in which he loses control. The harsh reality of the world transforms into the boy’s own colourful one. The complexity of this experience is translated in a play with estranging proportions, dense layers of fabric and transparent headpieces to suggest a falling movement.

Emma Hardstaff’s graduation collection ‘Soft Extravagance’ was driven by the concept of ‘exploded silhouettes’ resulting in flat patterns that transformed through fabric manipulation into oversized yet defined garments. The use of a sheer skeleton, the tulle layer, allowed for the apparent suspension of the key elements that make up each garment. Fabric manipulation creates the illusion of a constructed and recognisable garment.

Emma Hardstaff’s graduation collection ‘Soft Extravagance’ was driven by the concept of ‘exploded silhouettes’ resulting in flat patterns that transformed through fabric manipulation into oversized yet defined garments. The use of a sheer skeleton, the tulle layer, allowed for the apparent suspension of the key elements that make up each garment. Fabric manipulation creates the illusion of a constructed and recognisable garment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Marije Seijn’s collection is about ‘the decay of glory, the fall from grace’, inspired by the story of ‘Little Edie’, as told in the 1975 documentary Grey Gardens. Marije Seijn ‘built’ her garments with numerous layers of worn out found materials, wools and shiny fabrics, all merged together in voluminous pieces. It is unclear whether pieces are constructed by layers of damaged fabric or by desperately recovered ones.

Fien Ploeger’s graduation collection ‘Full Blown’ explores the concept of hyperreality in relation to the body. Her designs alter the body in a way that not necessarily answers to current beauty ideals. She explores the extremes of our tendency to perfect ourselves. “Is it still fashion or does it become an object? The estranging fashion objects are made off slick, shiny materials that grant them a sense of beauty, like Jeff Koons’ balloon sculptures.”

Fien Ploeger’s graduation collection ‘Full Blown’ explores the concept of hyperreality in relation to the body. Her designs alter the body in a way that not necessarily answers to current beauty ideals. She explores the extremes of our tendency to perfect ourselves. “The estranging fashion objects are made off slick, shiny materials that grant them a sense of beauty, like Jeff Koons’ balloon sculptures.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Olya Kuryschuk’s graduation collection of ‘trashed wedding dresses’ is a vision of clashing fashion cultures. To her the ‘glittery, glamorous wedding dress’ is the symbol of the trashy fashion values of the West. Olya Kuryschuk mixes this ‘trashy-ness’ with a completely different world of trashy fashion in Africa; ripped clothes and garbage bags. The result is equally ‘pop culture’ and tribal.

For her graduation collection ‘#1’ Vera Roggli experimented with rubber. Allowing herself to be guided by this design process, tirelessly perfecting her procedures, led to a new material with highly specific effects, and to a new way of attaching fabrics to each other. Vera Roggli also interpreted rubber into 3D designs such as bags and shoes, which she made in collaboration with footwear and product designer Roderick Pieters.

For her graduation collection ‘#1’ Vera Roggli experimented with rubber. Allowing herself to be guided by this design process, tirelessly perfecting her procedures, led to a new material with highly specific effects, and to a new way of attaching fabrics to each other. Vera Roggli also interpreted rubber into 3D designs such as bags and shoes, which she made in collaboration with footwear and product designer Roderick Pieters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The idea behind Richard Quinn’s graduation collection is ‘to bring cracked couture to life’. His dresses are life size 3D versions of his design process using a collage technique of ripped up and reassembled images of classic evening gowns. White painting canvas is used for the main fabric to resemble sketching paper. This effect of the rough sketch versus the perfectly finished couture dress is also implemented in his prints and embellishments.

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Charlotte Tydeman’s final collection explores the objectification of female forms during the 50’s through sculpture and pin-up imagery. Her designs mix elaborately worked fabrics with bold sexual shapes in neoprene, all predominantly in skin and pink tones, in equal parts ‘couture dream dress’ and comment on the most contemporary feminist identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scheltens & Abbenes X Epoi: Separate As One

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Photographers Maurice Scheltens & Liesbeth Abbenes did this beautiful art publishing project called ‘Separate As One’, gracefully assigned by Japanese luxury leather goods brand Epoi, and for which I had to honor to deliver the necessary copy. It happened to be inspired by one of my all time favorite artists: Alexander Calder.

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The art photography couple Maurice Scheltens and Liesbeth Abbenes have worked unwaveringly for nearly a decade and a half, carving out their unique identity as image makers. Whether commissioned by brands or magazines their work is persistently autonomous. Only the actual characteristics of the objects in front of their camera are directional for their creative process. Structures, colours, shapes and the nature of the materials used are the key elements in their photographic compositions that play with the eye.

For Epoi Scheltens & Abbenes created a series of six photographic works using the leather parts for Epoi bags to be. Inspired by famous mobiles they allow these parts and their shadows to find their own balance inside the photographic frame, freed from gravity and air circulation. ‘Separate as one’ is an ode the ‘sum of parts’ of great design.

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At their studio in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Scheltens & Abbenes create their photographic work for a choice list of brands including Hermes, Chanel, Balenciaga, Kenzo, Maison Martin Margiela, Uniqlo, Vitra, Pastoe and Arper, as well as for top magazine titles such as Fantastic Man, The Gentlewoman, Pin Up Magazine, Modern Design Review and T Magazine, the New York Times Style Magazine. Although the work is considered applied art as it results from these assignments, many of these series have been shown at prominent galleries and museums around the world, including Three Shadows Gallery in Beijing, Art Institute Chicago, Huis Marseille and Foam in Amsterdam, Kunsthal in Rotterdam and Danziger Gallery in New York.

In Japan Scheltens & Abbenes had exhibitions at Louis Vuitton, Limart and IMA in Tokyo, and they are currently working with Dutch designers Scholten & Baijings on a book for the contemporary porcelain project 2016/, part of the 400th anniversary of Arita Porcelain.

Modebelofte 2013 ‘Future Fashions’

Monday, October 28th, 2013

During Dutch Design Week, from october 19 till 27 in Eindhoven, my lovely client – the award winning concept store You Are Here – organized the magnificent fashion talent exhibition ‘Modebelofte 2013 – Future Fashions’ in the historic and yet to be renovated barracks of the military police. The handsome location called Kazerne got a great kick start to it’s new life as a cultural hotspot. It was an honor to collaborate – copy wise – on the ‘Modebelofte 2013 – Future Fashions’ exhibit showcasing the phantasmagorical new tech and hyper crafted works by designers Ana Rajcevic, Duran Lantink, Jef Montes, Matija Cop, Mi-Ah Rödiger, Pauline van Dongen, Sadie Williams, Silvia Romanelli, Stephanie Baechler, Volker Koch, Wim Bruynooghe, Xiao Li, Dewi Bekker, Jantine van Peski, Jenny Postle, Laerke Hooge Andersen, Minju Kim, Winde Rienstra, Anastasia Radevich, Anne Vaandrager, Cat Potter and Rianne Suk. For this year’s Modebelofte, the team from You Are Here collaborated with Glamcult Studio, curator Hanka van der Voet and producers Lenn Cox and Gerard Koot. Photography courtesy of Dirk van den Heuvel.

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exhibition text by Mo Veld

Wim Bruynooghe (left), Pauline van Dongen (shoes and dress) and Yoram Tomasoha

 

Nadine Goepfert and Xiao Li

Maiko Takeda and Duran Lantink

Alfhild Sarah Gulper

Jantine van Peski

Minju Kim (left), Dewi Bekker and Raffaela Grasspointer

Volker Koch (leather accessories left) and Stephanie Baechler

left to right: David Laport, Heleen Blanken (movie), Miriam de Waard and Jaimee Mckenna