Posts Tagged ‘Tijme Veldt’

Modebelofte 2014 ‘Seductive Precursors’

Friday, September 16th, 2016

Better posted late than never as the 2014 edition was when Modebelofte – an annual international selection fierce freshly graduated fashion talents showcased during Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven – came into full force when initiator YOU ARE HERE teamed up with curators and designers Niek Pulles a.k.a. Heyniek  and Harm Rensink. Having been part of the Modebelofte team from 2012, guarding the concept and all the copy along the way, it is my honor to shine some light on the creative forces released into this world year after year. See HERE a video impression by Heyniek.

The designers selected for the 2014 edition were: Charlotte Tydeman, Angel Chen, Richard Quinn, Fiona O’Neill, Olya Kuryschuk, Jessica Mort and Anita Hirlekar  from Central Saint Martins; Ida Gro Christiansen  and Emma Hardstaff from Royal College of Art, in London; Adam Marc James from University of Westminster; Inna Stein & Caroline Rohner from Weissensee School of Art, Berlin; Tijme Veldt, Fien Ploeger, Klara Válková, Marije Seijn and Jurjen van Houte from Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Amsterdam; Hyein Seo and Flora Seierl from Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp; Bastian Visch and Gino Anthonisse from Royal Academy of Art, The Hague; Karin Vlug, Vera Roggli, Chiara Siahaan, Sonia Aissaoui and Yiyu Chen from ArtEZ, Arnhem.

A selection:

In an attempt to capture body movements Ida Gro Christiansen came to combine flexible materials with stiffer ones allowing for new shaping possibilities and a different shaping language. The untraditional material combination adds an uncontrollable dimension into the pattern cutting process. The main material for the collection is a base of super thin stretch tulle, with boning heat pressed into it, made of laser cut furniture wool from Kvadrat hand painted with a high gloss rubber. 

In an attempt to capture body movements Ida Gro Christiansen came to combine flexible materials with stiffer ones allowing for new shaping possibilities and a different shaping language. The untraditional material combination adds an uncontrollable dimension into the pattern cutting process. The main material for the collection is a base of super thin stretch tulle, with boning heat pressed into it, made of laser cut furniture wool from Kvadrat hand painted with a high gloss rubber.

modebelofte4

Flora Miranda’s collection deals with the disintegration of physical borders, with the immaterial body and being. Her vision was to beam oneself from one place to the other, to break the system of space and time. The collection shows futuristic garments, fragmented and fleeing from their strict form. Colours are reduced to black and blue, making the body seem ‘scanned’ and read as pure information. The material shows sharp borders and hard shapes. Digitally printed leather is floating in rings around the body

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

modebelofte-tijme-veldt-dutch-design-week-2014

Tijme Veldt’s graduation collection ‘Rosa Supernova’ is about a boy who can’t tell the difference between his dreams and his reality anymore. The visual narrative closes in on the moment in which he loses control. The harsh reality of the world transforms into the boy’s own colourful one. The complexity of this experience is translated in a play with estranging proportions, dense layers of fabric and transparent headpieces to suggest a falling movement.

Emma Hardstaff’s graduation collection ‘Soft Extravagance’ was driven by the concept of ‘exploded silhouettes’ resulting in flat patterns that transformed through fabric manipulation into oversized yet defined garments. The use of a sheer skeleton, the tulle layer, allowed for the apparent suspension of the key elements that make up each garment. Fabric manipulation creates the illusion of a constructed and recognisable garment.

Emma Hardstaff’s graduation collection ‘Soft Extravagance’ was driven by the concept of ‘exploded silhouettes’ resulting in flat patterns that transformed through fabric manipulation into oversized yet defined garments. The use of a sheer skeleton, the tulle layer, allowed for the apparent suspension of the key elements that make up each garment. Fabric manipulation creates the illusion of a constructed and recognisable garment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

024-copy

Marije Seijn’s collection is about ‘the decay of glory, the fall from grace’, inspired by the story of ‘Little Edie’, as told in the 1975 documentary Grey Gardens. Marije Seijn ‘built’ her garments with numerous layers of worn out found materials, wools and shiny fabrics, all merged together in voluminous pieces. It is unclear whether pieces are constructed by layers of damaged fabric or by desperately recovered ones.

Fien Ploeger’s graduation collection ‘Full Blown’ explores the concept of hyperreality in relation to the body. Her designs alter the body in a way that not necessarily answers to current beauty ideals. She explores the extremes of our tendency to perfect ourselves. “Is it still fashion or does it become an object? The estranging fashion objects are made off slick, shiny materials that grant them a sense of beauty, like Jeff Koons’ balloon sculptures.”

Fien Ploeger’s graduation collection ‘Full Blown’ explores the concept of hyperreality in relation to the body. Her designs alter the body in a way that not necessarily answers to current beauty ideals. She explores the extremes of our tendency to perfect ourselves. “The estranging fashion objects are made off slick, shiny materials that grant them a sense of beauty, like Jeff Koons’ balloon sculptures.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

027-copy

Olya Kuryschuk’s graduation collection of ‘trashed wedding dresses’ is a vision of clashing fashion cultures. To her the ‘glittery, glamorous wedding dress’ is the symbol of the trashy fashion values of the West. Olya Kuryschuk mixes this ‘trashy-ness’ with a completely different world of trashy fashion in Africa; ripped clothes and garbage bags. The result is equally ‘pop culture’ and tribal.

For her graduation collection ‘#1’ Vera Roggli experimented with rubber. Allowing herself to be guided by this design process, tirelessly perfecting her procedures, led to a new material with highly specific effects, and to a new way of attaching fabrics to each other. Vera Roggli also interpreted rubber into 3D designs such as bags and shoes, which she made in collaboration with footwear and product designer Roderick Pieters.

For her graduation collection ‘#1’ Vera Roggli experimented with rubber. Allowing herself to be guided by this design process, tirelessly perfecting her procedures, led to a new material with highly specific effects, and to a new way of attaching fabrics to each other. Vera Roggli also interpreted rubber into 3D designs such as bags and shoes, which she made in collaboration with footwear and product designer Roderick Pieters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

015-copy

The idea behind Richard Quinn’s graduation collection is ‘to bring cracked couture to life’. His dresses are life size 3D versions of his design process using a collage technique of ripped up and reassembled images of classic evening gowns. White painting canvas is used for the main fabric to resemble sketching paper. This effect of the rough sketch versus the perfectly finished couture dress is also implemented in his prints and embellishments.

009-copy

Charlotte Tydeman’s final collection explores the objectification of female forms during the 50’s through sculpture and pin-up imagery. Her designs mix elaborately worked fabrics with bold sexual shapes in neoprene, all predominantly in skin and pink tones, in equal parts ‘couture dream dress’ and comment on the most contemporary feminist identity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIETVELD ACADEMIE Fashion class of 2014

Thursday, September 4th, 2014

Just in time before the new semester at the GERRIT RIETVELD ACADEMY in Amsterdam kicks off, the last two students from the class of 2014 passed their thesis which rounds up their graduation. So here they are, the amazing talens I was once again proud to nurture with some critical theoretic reflection: Anne-Rixt Gast, Tijme Veldt, Katja Hannula, Mikolaj Kocon, Simon Lextrait, Klara Válková, Fien Ploeger, Marije Seijn, Carlynn Armour, Marcel Kröpfl and Jurjen van Houte.

Watch their graduation show HERE and look into the paper – copy by yours truly – HERE. The beautiful paper and all other communication around THE FASHION SHOW 2014 was created by Rietveld graphic design graduates Line-Gry Hørup, Niklaus Mettles and Severin Bunse.

 

Show pictures courtesy of Team Peter Stigter.

Anne-Rixt Gast 

Anne-Rixt Gast

 

Tijme Veldt

Tijme Veldt

Katja Hannula                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katja Hannula

Mikolaj Kocon

Mikolaj Kocon

 

Simon Lextrait

Simon Lextrait

Simon Lextrait

Klara Válková

Klara Válková

 

 

Fien Ploeger

Fien Ploeger

Marije Seijn

Marije Seijn

Carlynn Armour (x20)

Carlynn Armour (21)

Marcel Kröpfl

Marcel Kröpfl

Jurjen van Houte

Jurjen van Houte